Blog Entry

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

Posted on: February 5, 2011 7:38 pm
Edited on: February 5, 2011 7:46 pm
 
Posted by Andy Benoit
C. Martin (US Presswire)
Every year the Hall of Fame announcement leaves a handful of elite all-time players on the outside looking in. This was especially true this season. Michael Wilbon of ESPN wrote beforehand that all 15 HOF finalists were worthy of enshrinement. Whether you agree with the extremism of Wilbon’s position or not, we can all agree that this was an especially competitive HOF class.

But the key problem for those who did not get in this year was not the fact that there was a thick crop of very deserving finalists (though that was certainly a factor), the problem was the amount of position overlap.

There were four pass catchers up for consideration, four defensive linemen and three running backs. You have to assume players at the same position were pitted firmly against each other at some point during the voters’ seven-and-a-half-hour debate. The principle of split votes naturally comes into play.

Plus, normally the Hall of Fame debate involves position vs. position discussions. (Example: do we prioritize a wide receiver over a linebacker?) That issue will always be relevant; this year, voters had to first figure out who was representing the position. Say a wide receiver is deemed more important than a linebacker. OK…now, is a second wide receiver who was almost as great as the first wide receiver more important than a linebacker? If that second wide receiver had been compared to that same linebacker, but the first wide receiver had never entered the discussion, the second wide receiver would look a lot better. It’s just simple subconscious behavior.

This issue of position overlap likely worked against Curtis Martin, Jerome Bettis, Cris Carter, Tim Brown, Andre Reed, Cortez Kennedy, Charles Haley and Chris Doleman in the voters’ debates.

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 10, 2012 7:15 am
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 10, 2012 7:13 am
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

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Since: Jun 4, 2007
Posted on: February 8, 2011 12:47 pm
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

Cris Carter (ESPN) didnt get in but Marshall Faulk (NFL Network) did.  Is the NFL taking care of their own and sticking it to ESPN?  Carter's career was better, longer and more consistently productive.  Faulk had like 4 good years.  I mean, all Cris Carter did, was catch touchdowns.  Something stinks here.   



Since: Aug 9, 2010
Posted on: February 5, 2011 10:30 pm
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

What position did Ed Sabol play?

I understand that non-players can contribute greatly to the history of the NFL. What I don't understand is how the selection process allows Ed Sabol to get in the Hall over some of the greatest players to ever lace em up. I'm not here to knock Ed Sabol. I'm here to call for some kind of change in the selection process. This hokey 5 modern day "player" rule has to go. Why not have a special category (when needed) to induct the Ed Sabol's and Paul Tagliabu's of the world without snubbing an actual player. And I don't care if 7 or 8 players go in one year as long as they are worthy of induction. Cris Carter deserves to be in Canton. Period. Why continually insult him year after year when everybody tends to agree that he belongs?

But if we are comparing players at the same positions to eachother can somebody explain to me how Richard Dent gets in over Chris Doleman??? Doleman and Dent played exactly the same amount of seasons in exactly the same era. Heck, they were in the same Division! Doleman ended his career with 23 more sacks, 243 more tackles, 7 more forced fumbles, 11 more fumbles recovered and was elected to 4 more Pro Bowls and was First Team All Pro more than Richard Dent. So how much credit does Richard Dent get for being part of one Super Bowl winning team? I just don't get it...

I want the Hall of Fame to continue to be selective. I want it to be an honor for the best of the best only. I don't mind keeping the first ballot selection for the cream of the crop either. But beyond that I think a Hall of Fame player is a Hall of Fame player. If we have a year here and there where 7 guys get in then sobeit. And if you want to put Ed Sabol in that's cool. But these rules and restrictions turn out to be slaps in the faces of players that clearly deserve to be enshrined.




Since: Sep 6, 2009
Posted on: February 5, 2011 8:50 pm
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

I love Curtis, I wear his Home and Away jerseys to most games that I attend. Class act all the way and arguably the greatest player in Jets history, but I don't have a huge issue with Curtis not getting in first vote. There was never a point during Martin's career where you would think "there goes the best running back in football." He always seemed to be overshadowed by someone, be it Barry and Emmit early in his career, or Faulk and Tomlinson in later years. He was great, but never the guy that gave you goosebumps and made you think you were watching something special. He was a grinder, who tended to do his best work in the second half when defenses wore down, and at the end of a game you would look at his stats and almost be surprised how many yards he had. He was steady and workmanlike and fortunate enough to stay healthy for 10 years, so at the end of his career he has undeniable hall of fame numbers, but if you reserve the "first vote" status for the truly special, I can live with Curtis having to wait a year to get his due. Now if for some reason he doesn't get in next year, then I will be the first to complain that he was robbed, especially since there is probably not a first ballot HOFer in the new crop next year!



Since: Nov 8, 2006
Posted on: February 5, 2011 8:12 pm
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

It's an utter insult and disgrace that Curtis Martin did not make the HOF on his first try - great player, great citizen, conducted himself professionally and knew when to get out of the game. 


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